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Carlo Quinonez

PD22197: Building Functional 3d-Printable Lab Equipment Using Fusion 360

(Duration 54:52)

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Key Learning

Key Learning

  • Learn how to breakdown complex products into compose-able, 3D-printable designs
  • Learn how to design air-tight parts and thermal insulation compatible with FDM printers
  • Learn how to stream sensor and log data to Data360 for visualization
  • Learn how to create scripts to automate complex design workflows and generate toolpaths for FDM printers

Description

Description

This class is based on FATHOM’s experience using Fusion 360 software to design a complex, functional, 3D-printable piece of lab equipment—a cloud-connected microbiological culture incubator called Crucible that’s capable of simulating extremophile environments. After a brief introduction to the project and its challenging requirements, we’ll dive into structuring designs that have powerful timelines, yet are conducive to successive design revisions by a large distributed engineering team. We will also explore how the final look of the product relates to the constraints of 3D printing and the importance of self-supporting geometry. Finally, we’ll discuss why and how we created a slicer for fused deposition modeling (FDM) printers inside of Fusion 360 software. This session features Fusion 360.

Target Audience

Target Audience

Engineers, Researchers, Education

Speakers

Speakers

Carlo Quinonez

As the director of research at FATHOM, Carlo Quiñonez coordinates internal and external research projects at the forefront of advanced manufacturing. He has 20 years of experience in additive manufacturing, prototyping, product design, and electrical and mechanical engineering. After receiving his doctorate in biology from the prestigious California Institute of Technology, Quiñonez focused on hardware development and joined a product design studio that built bespoke lighting systems. Eventually, his path led him back to science as a post-doctoral researcher at the University of California, San Diego, where he developed 3D-printable scientific instrumentation for microfluidic experiments. Prior to joining FATHOM, Quiñonez worked at Autodesk Research in the Bio/Nano/Programmable Matter Group, developing tools for bioprinting and contributing to Project Cyborg, a cloud-based platform of design tools for life sciences.

Sebastian Morales

Related Classes

Related Classes

Tags

Published

  • 2016
  • PD22197
  • AU Las Vegas

Software

  • Fusion 360

Industries

  • Life Sciences Manufacturing
  • Advertising. Publishing and Graphic Design

Topics

  • Product Design
  • Manufacturing and Production