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Kendall Casey

GEN22373: Page Setup for Plotting to Scale: Model Versus Paper Space—Which Way Is Best for You?

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Key Learning

Key Learning

  • Discover 3 different methods of plotting drawings to scale
  • Understand the necessary settings and workflow to plot to scale from both model and paper space
  • Compare and contrast the pros and cons of plotting from model space versus paper space
  • Determine which plotting method is best for you

Description

Description

Plotting to scale is something that seems to be omitted from a lot of the textbooks. And for most of us, template files have already been established and we gladly go about our business using them. But what happens when you need to set up your own pages to plot correctly? This course will demonstrate 3 distinctly different methods to plot to scale. The “old school” method of setting drawing limits, changing text sizes, and dimension scale factor and plotting from Model Space might still be used in some cases. The “confusing way,” which establishes a plot scale in the page setup—which conflicts with the annotation scale—does work in the end. The “best way,” wherein the page-setup scale is 1:1 and the scaling is done with the viewport, works fantastically with annotative objects and their scale setting. Attendees will gain setup requirements and pitfalls for each method. Regardless of the means you decide to use, always design your projects at full scale. This session features AutoCAD.

Target Audience

Target Audience

Basic CAD users, who are totally dependent on existing template files.

Speakers

Speakers

Kendall Casey

Kendall Casey is a senior instructor and department head for the Computer-Aided Drafting and Design Program at Arkansas State University-Beebe. His education includes a Master of Science degree in geographic information systems, a Bachelor of Science degree in mechanical engineering technology, and an Associate of Applied Science degree in computer-aided drafting and design. He began using AutoCAD software in 1991 with release 11. After spending roughly 10 years using AutoCAD software and Mechanical Desktop software in product design for a commercial refrigerator manufacturer, a chance to impart his nerdy CAD skills became a reality. Casey is very passionate about AutoCAD software and loves others to grow their knowledge. He has been teaching students in CAD since 2004, with graduates scattered across the nation.

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Tags

Published

  • 2016
  • GEN22373
  • AU Las Vegas

Software

  • AutoCAD

Industry

  • General Manufacturing and Product Design

Topics

  • AutoCAD and General Design